The mansard roof trim is pretty straightforward. First it’s best to punch out and label all the pieces according to the schematic sheet. (There is both horizontal and vertical trim.) I used a sharpie to write the names on the back–the backs won’t show once the pieces are glued on.

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Notice the each of the curved mansard trim pieces form a pair, one curved right and one left. (These look like cartoon palm trees to me :-))

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Also note that there is a definite top and bottom to each pair. The top has a more square angle, the bottom is more angular. The squarer end goes at the top against the top roof trim.

First, the straight pieces go horizontally across the top of the roof on the right side of the house, and vertically on the front against the tower as here:

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The horizontal top trim piece on the right side of the house and the vertical piece on the back.

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Now for the curved pieces. Note how the squarer end goes against the horizontal trim from the last step and ends at the bottom trim.

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I used plenty of tape to hold these pieces in place until the glue set.

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You’ll see I have an ugly gap. This is because the pieces don’t compensate for the thickness of the shingles. I have a layer of shingles and a layer of thin cardboard beneath it, which has distorted the dimensions of the roof.

I could have 1) compensated and only shingled to where the trim piece would fall; or 2) used sandpaper or paint to simulate shingles instead of using real ones.

Live and learn. I came up with a solution to fill the gap, which I’ll show later.

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The tower top horizontal pieces. Notice that two are longer–those are the side pieces. The front and back are the shorter ones.

Below you can see the tower top piece in place and the curved pieces.

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The front with the curved pieces in place.

I pondered a lot about how to fill the gaps. Tear the shingles off and do it again? I’m not that diligent. This house is a learning experience more than anything else.

I rifled through my supplies and found some wood veneer strips I’d picked up from Cascade Miniatures (http://www.led-n-minis.com/) I lined them up in the gap and they don’t look too bad. Almost like that’s what I was supposed to do!

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Hopefully others will find a better solution or not screw up like me!

You can see on the last picture that I’ve started putting in the windows. That’s next time!

 

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