Beacon Hill: Chimney

8 Comments

I have the walls papered (will be trimmed with molding), and the ceiling started, but I decided to wait on the chandeliers until I have more of the structure built so I don’t damage anything.

Going back to the building instructions, the next step on the outside is the chimney.

Pieces from left to right: chimney sides, chimney top (small piece at top), third floor hearth (small piece at bottom), and the chimney outside trim.

The third-floor hearth gets inserted into the fireplace hole. You have to turn the piece sideways and wriggled it in there. The tab in the back goes through the outside wall.

Sides go on the sides–the side with one tab faces the house, the two tabbed side faces the outside of the house. I constantly got these turned around.

The top fits onto the sides.

The trim goes on like this.

Before gluing, I lined the hearth and chimney with brick paper so it looks more realistic.

The hearth with the chimney sides now glued in place.

Chimney sides and top in place. I left the top unglued (just pushed it into the slots) in case I need to change or fix something later.

I am not putting the chimney trim on yet until I decide what colors to paint the house and trim. Plus I might want to brick the outside of the chimney.

I have to run off to a conference, but when I return, I’m going to the hardware store to get latex paint for the outside so I can get started finishing the outside and settling it on top of the garage. I will probably also put a light on one of the third floor windowsills as I did to the other half of the house before putting on the roof.

It’s coming along!

 

Beacon Hill: Left side top floor, front bay, interior

2 Comments

I’m setting the house on top of the garage kit from Hobby Builders Supply. My idea is to run stairs up the outside on the left to a porch (which I’ll build), having the front entrance where the side bay window is. I’ll build that later.

For now, I’ve added the walls to the third floor, and given them a primer coat of latex paint.

I realized I should put the bay window on the front, so if I’m wallpapering the inside, I don’t mess it up trying to decorate the interior of the bay.

Bay window parts are pretty simple–the middle and two sides (middle is bigger), plus an “extension” piece and trim for the top. The thinner part of the window wall goes on top (shown here).

The windows fit easily onto the tabs that extend out from the house.

The extension piece (the smaller of the two half octagonal pieces) goes here. It sort of rests on the edges.

The trim piece goes on the extension pieces, overlapping evenly on all sides.

For now, I’m leaving the extension and trim pieces off, because I’m still not sure what colors I’ll use for the exterior.

Back inside. I want a fireplace wall that I’ll trim off, so I painted it with three coats of antique white craft paint and two coats of clear gloss finish (Deco Art is the brand I’m using).

The opening on the right will be the front entrance / porch.

Wallpaper added. All the wallpaper I bought for this house didn’t look quite right when I put it with the flooring and the furniture that will be in here. But oh well. Stock for another house!

This is scrapbook paper. I decided to be a little eclectic. I’ll wallpaper the insides of the bay as well.

Next, finishing the ceilings! And possibly making chandeliers. Or maybe I’ll do more of the structure before installing lights.

Beacon Hill: Left side continued

2 Comments

I’ve glued together the left and left front walls and put in the second floor. I went all over it with a thin coat of latex to seal the wood and then started laying in the electric tape.

As you can see, I cut a hole in the second floor for the stairs I’ll put in myself.

Added the third floor and finished putting in the tape wiring. This used a 15 ft. roll of the tape.

I decided against a staircase going to floor three so I could have more room on the floor for furniture. I’m thinking I’ll leave two sides open, so more can be seen, which means I’ll have to put in columns to brace the unsupported corners.

What I learned from building the first half: Glue together the walls before painting and decorating. Warpage is greatly reduced. You can make paper patterns of the walls for wallpaper and install after running in the tape wiring (if using tape wiring).

What I learned from other projects: Bending the tape wire in 90-degree turns is much faster and easier than splicing. I show more details on tape wiring here: https://jennsminis.wordpress.com/2015/08/10/half-scale-bungalow-lights/

Now to decorate walls and ceilings, make and put in lights. I’m going to attempt some ornate chandeliers. I’m excited to be progressing!

%d bloggers like this: