The paperclay turned out to be easier to use than I feared. I kept it in a ziplock bag after opening, quickly digging in each time I needed some and sealing it back up again.

Here’s the base stonework on the quarter-inch experimental house step by step.

First step is to build up the shape of the walls. Here’s my bare wall coated with yellow glue (wood glue or titebond).

Next I put a roll of paperclay at the base and then smoothed it up with a plastic tool and my fingers (tool easily purchased at hobby store, e.g., Michael’s)

For some reason, I had to remind myself to add the glue to the wood, but it’s essential. I guess I figured the clay would just stick to everything itself (like it does to my fingers), but no. The glue holds it in place while you form it.

Base walls are shaped and ready for the stonework.

The kit includes a mold for the paperclay stones. This is quarter-inch scale. I’ll have to make my own for one-inch scale or figure another way to make stones when I do this on the Westville.

Paperclay smoothed into the mold.

Molded paperclay glued to the base. I cut away the excess and reused.

Poking with a stencil brush adds a little texture.

Made little stones to add to the base. These were easy to roll with my fingers.

I dabbed each stone with glue then placed it at the bottom of the wall.

Filling in the stair wall was a little trickier, and involved lots of fingerwork and trimming. This is the stair wall half done (above).

Stair walls done.

When I came back after letting everything dry overnight, I saw that the paperclay had shrunk (it does that), and it had pulled away from the top of the wall (as you can see above).

I added a row of stones under the ledge. They look darker in the photo because they were still wet, against the already dried portion.

The stonework is mostly done. Now to let it dry and then paint it.

This part was much easier and went much more quickly than I feared. I’ll see what happens in the painting stage!