Beacon Hill Left Side: Roof and Trim

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Sconces done and installed on the third floor!

Now for the roof.

The mansard roof base goes on first, then the roof supports fit into slots. I also have the flat roof top painted and installed. It’s best to finish the ceiling side of the roof top as well, because it will be tough to get in there to paint once the roof is done.

I couldn’t figure out what this piece was for, because it had come separated from the others months ago. I finally realized it went on the short roof side, the one that would be up against the tower if I’d kept the house together. (I also finally found it in the instructions.)

The instructions say to put this piece in first, then the roof, then the piece I have it resting against (3A) last. I found it easier to put the 3A piece on first. 3A looks like this from the other side:

I will trim that corner when I’m ready to do interior trim. You can see how I’ve finished the ceiling.

Next step is to paint and put on the roof top trim and the mansard base trim (which runs along the mansard base).

Both these photos show the mansard base trim running around the edge. It overhangs 1/4 inch.

Now for the roof panels!

First, the chimney side. I had to sand the roof piece a little to get it to fit around the chimney. These clamps are wonderful for holding the curved roof in place while the glue dries.

The instructions say to do the short (right side) roof first, and then the front roof, but I found it easier to do the front first, especially as I don’t have the rest of the house on the right side.

For those not cutting the house in half, the lower corner of this wall will fit against the tower. I’ll have to cover it or think of something fun to do with it.

While the roof was drying I went ahead and put together the front bay window roof.

When figuring out how the bay roof pieces go, it helps to note that the grain of the wood kind of flows in the same direction. Make sure the good side is down when you add the masking tape hinge.

The roof, good side up, on top of the bay window. (This is set into place to test–the pieces went together more smoothly when I glued them.)

The horizontal and some of the vertical trim being painted. I somehow lost the horizontal trim for the front side of the house and had to cut another. I am finding I’m missing small pieces of trim, which fell out of the punch-out sheets when I built the right side of the house. I swore I collected them all into boxes, but I’m still missing bits. Fortunately they’re fairly standard sized wood strips (1/2-inch; 1/4 inch).

Pictured from top to bottom are front bay bottom horizontal trim, vertical trim pieces, front bay horizontal trim (the short, wide pieces), and front and left side horizontal trim. I cut a new piece of horizontal trim for the front from scraps from the house sheets.

The trim glued in place with the corner trim pieces (at top of house) also in place. I’ll continue the same kind of trim on the garage floor later. Also I’m not putting in the left bay, because I’m going to use it as the front door.

Next I will trim the roof and chimney. I learned my lesson on the other side, and I’ll wait to shingle until everything is trimmed. I think we finish up the chimney after that.

It’s getting there!

 

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Beacon Hill: Third Floor and Roof Prep

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Building a dollhouse, like writing a book, involves lots of little decisions. To move forward, I need to put the roof on, but before I do that, I want to wire sconces in the third-floor room. Before I do that, I need to wallpaper that room, but I also need to figure out where the fireplace goes because I don’t want wallpaper there.

I skipped all the way to the end of the instructions (no!) to figure out the third-floor fireplace. Because it’s built in, there is only the trim and two pieces for the mantel. The piece with the long tab goes into the slot.

This helps me figure out where I want the wallpaper to stop–the fireplace will be a painted panel all the way to the ceiling, and the rest of the walls papered.

 

I’ve painted and glued the mansard roof support base to the outside of the walls and temporarily set in the roof supports. As you can see I’ve also started to paint the outside walls of the lower floors. The color might be too dark green for me, but I’ll see how it turns out.

Beginning the sconces. These will have dangles on them–it took me an entire episode of Outlander to make six of the nine dangly bits for one sconce! The pliers weren’t cooperating.

I guess it will take me another two episodes to finish both sconces. Fortunately I’m only on season one.

I’ll wallpaper and fix up the fireplace, install the sconces, and move on to the roof.

Beacon Hill: Left side continued

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I’ve glued together the left and left front walls and put in the second floor. I went all over it with a thin coat of latex to seal the wood and then started laying in the electric tape.

As you can see, I cut a hole in the second floor for the stairs I’ll put in myself.

Added the third floor and finished putting in the tape wiring. This used a 15 ft. roll of the tape.

I decided against a staircase going to floor three so I could have more room on the floor for furniture. I’m thinking I’ll leave two sides open, so more can be seen, which means I’ll have to put in columns to brace the unsupported corners.

What I learned from building the first half: Glue together the walls before painting and decorating. Warpage is greatly reduced. You can make paper patterns of the walls for wallpaper and install after running in the tape wiring (if using tape wiring).

What I learned from other projects: Bending the tape wire in 90-degree turns is much faster and easier than splicing. I show more details on tape wiring here: https://jennsminis.wordpress.com/2015/08/10/half-scale-bungalow-lights/

Now to decorate walls and ceilings, make and put in lights. I’m going to attempt some ornate chandeliers. I’m excited to be progressing!

Beacon Hill: Roof and Tower

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Mansard Roof

Now that I have most of the lighting done, it’s time to tackle the roof. Looks complicated but is not.

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I notice that the kitchen side of this dollhouse is rarely photographed, so I’m trying to put out as many pics of it as I can, in case this helps other builders. This is the kitchen side with bay window on, bay window roof temporarily in place (I’m going to cover it with copper). Ready to put on the main roof.

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The mansard roof pieces are very thin, and bend back into place. The instructions with the kit are pretty good on this. I put glue all over the roof supports (see pic above for the supports), and on the bottom of the mansard piece and the top. Masking tape helps everything stay while the glue dries. (The window sill is there because I had to wire in the lamp before I put on the roof).

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Putting the mansard roof piece on the front. Tacks help a little, but tape is best.

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Finished mansard roof on the kitchen side (there are only two sides to the roof on the kitchen half of the house). The brown stripe on it is me testing whether the color of stain will work (it’s Early American from Minwax).

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I’m using shingle strips for this house. Best to stain first.

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Before I put the roof pieces on, I traced them onto very thin cardboard. I’ll shingle the cardboard then glue the whole thing to the roof. Marked where the shingles strips will fall.

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Shingling begun. I found out (the hard way) that it’s better to cut the shingle pieces to length first than to try to cut out the hole in the middle for the window after gluing. Live and learn.

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The finished shingle sheets glued to the mansard roof. The ugly edges will be covered with trim.

Now for the Tower!

The tower is, in the kit, enclosed on four sides, but open on its bottom, so you could hang a chandelier from the very top and have it hang down to the third floor hall. Cool. But, of course, I wanted to change it.

I am interested in astronomy, so decided I’d create a little observatory up there. That means I need a floor for the tower and also to open one of the walls so we can see in. Already found a telescope for it.

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This is the back wall, which I will cut for the opening into the tower.

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The piece cut.

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The four tower walls assembled–the walls each have a large tab on their bottom edge that slide into the large square opening in the tower base (ignore the small slots for the moment).

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Because I want this to be a room, I had to put a floor back in. I took the piece that I punched out of the middle of the tower base and trimmed it down to slide it back in. You have to take out that piece at first, because the walls fit inside the opening it leaves behind.

 

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This is the underside of the tower. I have to cover the crease of the fitted-in floor piece and also support it. I cut four strips of 1/2″ wide wood and glued it on the seam of the floor on the underside of the tower (which will be the third-floor ceiling), using the decorative squares to make it look pretty.

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Here is the underside of the tower painted and ready to go.

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I went ahead and wallpapered the inside, because I knew I’d never fit the paper after finishing the tower. The floor will be covered with flooring later.

 

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I also wanted to hang a light in the third floor hall. This is an old light I had in the Big House, in the attic. I worried that it would be too long for the lower ceilings of this house, but the tower pokes up above the ceiling height of the third floor. Perfect!

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The tower on, ready to be glued in place. The instructions have you finish the roof first, but I wanted to wire in the light, and I couldn’t put the trim piece on until the wiring was done, but you have to put the trim piece on to support the roof sides. Clear? (Took me a while to figure out the sequence–cut wall, glue tower together, insert floor, support floor, put in light, glue tower to house top, run tape wire to tower, wire light, put on trim, do the roof … whew!)

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Here, I’ve extended the tape wire to the tower room and wired in the lamp. Then I glued on the trim (a solid piece that goes around the four sides), which I painted first.

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Let there be light! It works! Yay!!!

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Here’s another departure. I didn’t want to put on the tower roof, because I want to be able to look down into the room–plus the tiny telescope users will want to tilt their refractor high and look at Orion and the Pleiades and find the Andromeda galaxy (I can never see that thing).

I wanted to use the roof trim, but not the roof top. The problem is, though, that the roof sits down on tabs, and if I didn’t use the roof top, the trim didn’t have a smooth surface to rest on. Rather than try to cut off the tabs, which would be difficult at this point, I used 1/8 square strips to even out the edges.

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Now to put the roof pieces on the tower, which is exactly like putting the mansard pieces on the house. I have lots of tape and clamps to help out.

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So, now the tower and its roof are on.

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I am now in the process of putting on the shingles, again gluing them to very thin cardboard pieces, which will then be glued to the mansard roof.

Next time–trimming!! We’re getting there!

 

Beacon Hill–Progress

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I took some time away from building the exterior of the Beacon Hill to install more lights. Here’s one I made from jewelry findings from JAF / JAR plus the remnants of a Victorian chandelier I had hanging in The Big House.

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This was my first attempt to do a light without following instructions–I based it on ones I’d already done but adapted the findings for what I needed. The glass globes came off the old chandelier.

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I like how it turned out!

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Next, I finished the first-floor staircase by building a false door which looks like it leads either down to a basement or to a closet.

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Since I finished and wired the chandelier in the second-floor hallway, I was able to install flooring and the third floor landing railing.

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Another look at the second floor staircase and new chandelier.

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When I was in my yard, I noticed this perspective of the house through the window. I like how it looks, so now I’m contemplating leaving this side open. Of course, I’d loose wall space for furniture, but I’ll think about it.

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I wanted to put a lamp in the third floor room that will be a bedroom. I’d made this lamp some time ago just to see if I could, but had nowhere to put it. I had to find the window sill for the dormer window in the kit and finish it so I could wire the lamp through the sill and wire it in before I put on the roof.

I still have two more lights to do (kitchen and third floor hall), but I can put those in later.

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And of course, my assistants help with everything.

Beacon Hill: More Light Fixtures and Top

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Gradually moving on with the Beacon Hill.

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The beginning of a new chandelier. I need to make 24 of the little dangly things, eight on each candle holder.

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The most invaluable tools when making light fixtures: Needlepoint tweeters, round-nosed pliers, and forceps. The iced tea is essential as well.

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While glue dries on the fixture, I put the roof onto the house to see where I’ll need to cut it for my adventure in dividing the house in two. I didn’t want to take off too much.

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Looks like I’ll cut it right there. Time to bring out my trusty table saw.

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Next stage of the chandelier.

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Adding the candle sockets and bulbs (Cir-Kit sells the candle sockets; HBS sells the bi-pin bulbs).

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Chandelier done with the bottom parts glued in place.

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Wiring the chandelier through the ceiling.

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I had originally intended for this chandelier to go in the second floor stairwell, but it looks better in the bathroom–goes with the wallpaper. I’ll make something a little more rustic for the hall. This is going to be one wild bathroom.

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The test–it lights! Yay! I never thought I’d be able to make my own lights, and they’d turn out so pretty. Who knew?

I have more beads and also some old, broken lights from when I gutted The Big House. I’m looking at those old lights and thinking “spare parts.” I’m going to take those spare parts, play with new jewelry findings, and see what I can come up with. Maybe a mess! But it’s fun to play.

While I’m making light fixtures, I’m going to start painting the outside of the house. In the instructions for the Beacon Hill, the porch is next on the agenda. I need the base of the house painted before I glue on porch railings.

I’ll keep working!

 

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