Interlude: Finishing smaller projects


I needed a break from the Beacon Hill so finished up some quarter inch and micro scale projects.

This is the cute little Sunnyside Gardens, a microscale shop in the “Watercolors” series by Robin Betterly. I had completed the shop before, and now I finished the interior and landscaping kit. (I could have decorated the interior myself, but sometimes kits are more relaxing for me).

We have pots of plants, crates of seedlings, garden soil, garden tools, all kinds of fun stuff.

The interior is a bedroom upstairs of woodland themed furniture, and the shop downstairs, which includes a seed rack and display counters for all the garden goodies.

I had to wash out the exterior to get the photo of the interior through the door. Seed counter and pots inside.

A fun little kit. It’s on display in my living room with the first kit in the series (the cafe). Gee, there’s room for another kit next to the garden shop.

Next: Finished up the landscaping and added an outdoor tub to the quarter-inch scale Creekside Studio.

Decided to put a little vegetable garden here.

This kit turned out really well. I got this from Suzanne and Andrews Minis (link in sidebar under Quarter inch Resources). They don’t have this particular one anymore, but they have a similar kit called “Seaside Cottage,” which has a complete second floor.

Obviously, this needs furniture! Which I will do one day. Right now, I’m ready to return to the Beacon Hill and finish the outside details I need to build on.


Beacon Hill: A Gazillion Brackets


Final step is to do the brackets around the tower and mansard roof and the decorative roof brackets.

The instructions call this “exterior trim.” I say, “a ton o’ brackets.”

First, the brackets that go around the bottom of the tower and mansard roof.

These are sandwiched, large between two small. You need four complete brackets for each side of the tower, four on the front wall right and five on the right wall. That’s 25 total, and that’s just this half of the house … (you need 12 for the other half if you’re building the whole thing like a normal person). That’s a lotta brackets.

Ready for more sanding and painting.

You end up with a bunch of these.

Glue them bird-head up around the base of the tower, all four sides.

Back of the tower.

This is the right side walls–four in front, five in back.

Note that the end brackets on each wall are right at the edge, over the vertical trim. I glued those brackets on first, then spaced the others according to those.

The tower brackets were spaced about 2.5 inches from one another, the front wall 2 inches, the side wall 2.5 inches.

Last are the pointy and curly brackets that go around the edges of the roofs. Four complete ones on the tower, three on the porch, two on the right side (and three on the left). The look  like this on the sheets.

We have standalone posts, posts with curls, and curls alone. Again, you glue these brackets together in sandwiches.

You make a sandwich of two standalone posts around one post with curly. The unattached curl gets glued to the post depending on which direction you need to go on the roof. Those are glued on as you place them on the rooftops.

When they’re glued in place, they’ll look like this.

Don’t glue the last curly part in place! I’m holding it here as a demo.

Starting with the porch: The posts are all glued with the flat side of the post facing front (*except* the one on the back of the porch which faces the side–got it?)

Here are the post sandwiches glued in place.

The lone curly is then glued to the other side. For the porch post in the back, it’s done. It doesn’t get a second curly.

The porch roof done. Note that the brackets are on the *inner* edge of the roof trim.

On the tower–the four post sandwiches in place. Again, the flat side of the picket faces front (and rear), and they’re glued on the inner edge of the trim.

The curlys all glued in place to complete the brackets.

Brackets done on the side roof.

And … that’s it!! That is the last bit of the kit for the right side of the house.

I still have to finish the wall I knocked out, do a lot of touch-up paint, and trim more raw edges. Plus I did not use the foundation trim–I will be putting stone or brick paper around the bottom.

But hey, there we have it! Almost ready to move in!

I’ll probably take another break and build a different kit or smaller project, then come back and completely finish this half of the house before I start on the other half …

Beacon Hill: Trimming the Interior


I thought I needed to take a break from the Beacon Hill–I was going to do another project–but then I turned the house around and looked inside. No, I want to finish! I was inspired to keep going with moldings and trim, plus finishing the lamp for the kitchen.

The kitchen needs a lot of trimming from the bay window trim in the kit to baseboards, cornices, an L-molding to cover the gap in the corner (from warping). The inside of the door needs to be trimmed out, and a doorframe put in.

Painting. The piece with the curlicue ends is the bay window molding. It took me a while to figure out how it fit!

Everything glued in place (below). The bay window molding fits onto the edges of the bay window opening walls. (It makes sense when you stick it in there and see that it fits exactly in the opening.) The kitchen shelf (from the kit), fits over notches that stick out from the windows into the kitchen.

Next I trimmed out the main hall. Needed to cover raw edges and make everything look neater. I covered the ends of the staircase posts as well with stained boards.

The molding painted, varnished, and in place (below).

The second floor hall trim cut and waiting for painting and installation.

Back to the kitchen–needed to finish the light before I put in flooring and trim in room above it. It works!!

So this is what I’ve been doing behind the scenes. More trimming in the upstairs rooms to come.Almost done!

Then it will be back to the outside to build a wall and do the final work.


More projects in finishing stages

Leave a comment


Another half-inch scale house I’ve been playing with is this one. I won it, unfinished, in a raffle at a miniature show a couple years ago. It was originally a rustic shack with a pot-bellied stove and a built-in bed–I believe the house was called “Possum Hut.”


I wasn’t sure I wanted to continue with the rustic look. The gallery had been on the right wall–I moved it to the back so the ladder to it didn’t take up the entire middle of the room.


I also decided to put in a few electric lights–you can see the tape wire I started here.


The outside I left alone. It’s cute and weathered, apple green and burnt orange.IMG_6595

Inside, I decided to wallpaper. I like the spattered-look floor, so I’m leaving it alone. I couldn’t find any wallpaper I liked in my stash, so I chose some scrapbooking papers, three different ones, to wallpaper the interior. I cut each to fit between the beams, which took some doing.




The gallery in its new place with new railings. I might redo the bedding, which is original to the house. I purchased the weathered sink on Etsy.


The distressed half-inch scale table/chairs and hutch I bought at a NAME show–it was made by Ron and April Gill’s daughter, Michelle (I think I’m remembering all this correctly).

I will add one or two more pieces of furniture and accessories, a rag rug or two, but this tiny house is done enough to put up on my shelf on display. I like how it’s turning out!

What I’ve Been Working On

1 Comment

Now that I’m finally settled into my new house, I’ve been able to get back to projects. I am nearly finished with the inside of the Real Good Toys Half-Inch Scale Bungalow. Scroll down for photos!




As you can see, I moved the staircase to the middle of the house, made this one big room, and put in a fireplace.


Needs pictures and other touches, but you get the idea.




Upstairs, I made the left side of the house one big room instead of cutting it up. I wanted more room for furniture. The staircase comes out in the middle of it, but why not?







I’m pleased with the way the scrapbook paper came out as a mural. Amazed too! It wasn’t easy.


I played with the interior a little bit, removing a wall on the second floor and moving the staircase on the first floor.


I have more finishing touches to make (pictures, rugs, towels, plants, porch furniture), but it’s come a long way from blank pieces in a box!


The Big House Updates


I have updated all the photos in The Big House section of this blog (see top or right-hand menu). It’s just about done! Here is a taste of each room:


Front porch

First Floor:


Entrance Hall


Music Room

Second Floor:


Second floor hall


Kitchen (right side)


Kitchen: Left side


Utilities room

Third Floor:


Third floor hall





Fourth Floor (not as finished):




Artist studio


Game room

Almost done! Each room (esp top floor), needs a few finishing touches, and that’s it! It’s been a fun overhaul. I wonder if the next house I make will be “normal.” (Nah.)

Finished Halloween Room



I finished the Halloween room! Before Halloween! Scroll down to see the room from all angles; click pics for closer views. Enjoy!


An overview.








This cool, kind of steampunk-y table is by Bobbie Johnson. She does such beautiful work. There’s a gator underneath!




Most of the things in this room came from my stash of stuff that didn’t fit elsewhere. I bought a few things, like the potion bottles and the skull candle, but much was acquired hither and yon. The orange lights in the back hall can pulse on and off. Looks cool!

Older Entries

%d bloggers like this: