Westville: Stonework Painting

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After making sure the paperclay was thoroughly dry and gaps filled in, I started painting the stonework foundation by giving it several dirty gray water washes.

The wash is mostly water with two drops of hippo gray and one drop of black. I went over the stone work three or four times with this, letting it dry between washes. Gradually building up a base of very light gray.

Next I started painting in colors, keeping the paint very watery.

I used Burnt Umber, Hippo Gray, with a touch of Black Green. I later added a color called Latte (which looks like very milky coffee).

I added the colors one at a time: First wetting the brush, dabbing in paint, wetting brush again, dabbing off excess on waxed paper, and then applying that color to individual stones, choosing them at random. I didn’t so much carefully paint each stone as simply dab dab dab with the brush (sometimes more like smoosh smoosh smoosh).

If any one stone color seemed too dark, I’d rinse the brush and use the dirty water to tone it down.

I did a lot of trial and error, wiping off with a paper towel before it dried if I really didn’t like the result.

I went over the stones I’d say four or five times until I liked the look. I still might go back over them and smooth out the colors, making sure none of the white shows through.

It was fun to experiment. The house is taking on a rustic, old-world feel, but that’s fine as I’m doing an antique shop.

Now that the foundation is done and the porch is finished, the rest is going pretty quickly and easily. Next, the bay trim and balconies, then it’s time for the roof.

Westville–Stonework continued

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I did flee home for a few weeks in June, but I discovered a new mini museum in the process. I will post an update on the Westville here–the following posts will cover the mini museum and a couple other shorter projects I did in June.

Before I left on vacation, I put a Creative Paperclay base around the foundation pieces. This gives the stonework some depth.

The paperclay shrinks and cracks as it dries, but as I’ll be covering all this, I’m not bothered.

Yesterday, I bought more paperclay (ran out) and started in making the stonework with the mold (see previous posts). (Darker spot is where the paperclay is still wet).

Once I covered the entire foundation and let it dry overnight, I went back and filled in gaps with paperclay balls rolled to the approximation of a stone and glued onto the dried paperclay.

One drawback of paperclay is the way it shrinks–keep in mind that has to be compensated for.

The darker stones are the ones I glued on to fill the gaps. They’ll lighten as they dry.

Once everything is dry, I’ll fill in any more gaps and then start painting.

Note: It took two and a half 16 oz bricks of Creative Paperclay to do the foundation base and the molded stonework. (Or two 16 oz and one 8 oz).

A tip: Keep any opened paperclay in a sealed plastic bag. Even so, use it up in a few weeks to a month. Longer and it will be too dried out. You can add a little bit of water to drier paperclay to make  it useable.

Next post: My mini adventure!

Beacon Hill, Left Side–Interior pretty much done!

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After taking a break from the Beacon Hill, I was inspired to go in and finish the left side’s interior furnishings. Except for the garage, I pretty much have it how I want it. Click photos for larger versions.

The first floor music room.

Second floor living room / study, with gorgeous desk by Ferd Sobol. I knew I’d kick myself for not getting this desk that I absolutely love, and I am so glad I went ahead and bought it. It’s amazing, and I’ll do a separate post on it.

The bedroom. The showpiece in this room is the bed by June Clinkscales. Isn’t that beautiful?

June also made the bed stairs, which I turned into a nightstand.

I filled this house with the beautiful things I’ve been collecting either at shows or through auctions. It’s my fancy house.

More shots below! Click for larger pictures.

Below is a cellarette by J. Guthiel and a Lord of the Rings kind of collection of books and maps in Spanish. I’ll put that in a separate post too. (Way Cool Miniatures)

One final thing I did is to use posts to support the side of the house that I cut away. These are Houseworks porch posts, painted and cut to fit.

As you can see, I have much more to do on the garage. I’m going for woodshop-y clutter. I’m looking for and collecting more tools and benches / shelving. The car is a little too small (I think it’s 1:18 scale), but I like Mustangs so I’ll try to make it work.

There we have it! I’ll do a future post on the right side of the house, which too is almost done.

Beacon Hill: Right Side–Downstairs

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Back to the Beacon Hill. I’ve started adding furnishings and things to the first floor of the shabby chic side.

On the entrance hall side I have some furniture and a few fun things. I’ll put this all together and add rugs, pictures, etc.

The inhabitants are getting ready to go on a picnic.

Slowly filling up this adorable cabinet I recently bought.

On to the kitchen. I am adding things as I go.

I took the baker’s rack from the front porch project (see previous post), and repurposed it as kitchen shelves.

I finally have a place to display all the food I’ve collected! I will paint the table probably dark red or dark green and antique it.

It’s a start!

Beacon Hill: Done!

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This past week, I hustled my butt and finished up the left side of the Beacon Hill. I haven’t “moved in,” but I have accomplished enough to declare this build …

DONE!

Brackets and final steps:

The many pieces for the under-eave brackets.

Panels for the bay windows.

The brackets for the eaves are sandwiched together–two thins around a thick.

The roof brackets are built up of two pickets sandwiching a third  and then a single curly bracket butted against the sandwich.

All brackets glued together and painted.

I go into much more detail about the brackets in THIS POST.

The eave brackets go on the left side and the front of the left side, six each, evenly spaced (that is, more evenly than I have them).

One final bracket goes around the corner on the short wall. For people who don’t cut their Beacon Hill in half, this wall leads to the tower.

Roof brackets, of course, on the roof. You need to make right facing and left facing ones (I think one right and two left, but double-check). The flat part of the posts face the front of the house. The left side roof gets three brackets–two in front and one on the back left edge (see previous photo). For the back one, the flat part of the post faces the back of the house.

Adding the panels to the bay windows. I painted the larger panels with the same trim color as the brackets and all the trim on the house. Note that the wood grain of the panels goes horizontally. All the panel pieces are the same size except for the middle of the front bay window, which is longer than the others.

The smaller panel pieces (painted with the main house color) glued over the larger. It’s tricky to center them.

These photos also show the brackets (single brackets, no sandwiches) that go around the bay windows. The left bay gets nine (3 on each side), while the front gets ten (3, 4, 3).

There we have it. I now have the top floor windows installed as well.

The left side all trimmed.

In the interior, I decided not to put in the curving staircase. I just couldn’t make it go in right and look good. I will save the stairs for another project, maybe design a room box especially to show them off.

For now, I closed up the hole in the roof and repapered the ceiling.

Second floor with closed up floor.

Another thing I’ve decided to add is posts where the open walls are to give more support for the structure. I haven’t painted or glued these in yet–they will be the last things I install so I won’t knock them around while I decorate.

I’ve started going through my furniture and deciding exactly what to put in the rooms. This side of the house will be the elegant one, while the other side will be quaint, country, shabby-chic.

 

THE RIGHT SIDE:

 

 

I’m starting to add more furniture and decor to both sides, and when I’m finished, I will post.

I’m dusting off my hands from this project. It has been two years since I first opened the box and started to put together the pieces!

I hope my photos and demos have been helpful. For the full process, click the “Beacon Hill Dollhouse” tag on this post, or search “Beacon Hill” in the search bar. I tried to photograph as much of the process as possible.

I’m sticking a fork in this one. It’s done!!

Beacon Hill–Fireplaces

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The fireplaces for the Beacon Hill are pretty straightforward, but as the instructions are sparse and have few photos, here’s the fireplace construction:

Fireplace pieces laid out. From top row to bottom: Trim, front, firebox back and sides; base/hearth, sides; top pieces (mantel), which get glued together, flush in back–one is smaller than the other.

Test building: Front goes in slots on hearth / base.

The mantel: Glue smaller on top of larger, centered, and flush at back. Have the “good” side of both pieces on the outside.

Firebox from the back. Sides angle from back to front.

The whole thing roughed together. Larger piece of the mantel goes on top.

Trim goes on front. Note that the trim is flush at the top of the front (not bottom).

I finished my firebox and hearth with brick paper before gluing together. Shot of the angles of the back.

 

I glued my trim on before I glued the piece to the hearth. This is how I discovered that the trim should be flush on top not bottom. (Bottom part of trim does not fit in slots.)

View from top with sides added. Edges of sides go against back of front piece.

Sides glued in place.

Mantel added.

Side view.

Front view of finished fireplace. I finished painting after I glued it together, because I didn’t want it to warp.

Finished and painted fireplace in position in house. The second floor fireplace is identical to this one. I’ll show the third floor one when I get there.

I finished the floor and all the trims (baseboards, cornices, trim around the bay openings, trim, trim, trim. Lots of raw edges!)

Note: I did not use the scrolled “bay window trim” that comes with the kit. For what the kitchen bay one looks like see Beacon Hill: Trimming the Interior. The bay trims go into the front and left bay on this side of the house in the same way as the kitchen bay’s.

Staircase set in place. I still need to finish the staircase opening, add an extra step, and a few other details before I glue it in. Plus I want to make a chandelier so I’m not dodging the staircase when I put it in.

Gathering all the pieces and tools for new chandelier!

Beacon Hill–Catching up

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I’ve been working on the Beacon Hill since I returned from Chicago, in between working hard on about four books at once. I have made some progress.

The left bay window is finished and installed. You can see I have much cleaning up to do.

I also finished the inside of the garage (painted) and added a light.

This gadget is a junction splice between the tape wiring and the power supply. It can be used with LED lights (the black and red posts where wires can be placed), or simply screwed into the tape (which is what I did). I bought this from Carl Sahlberg at http://www.cr2s.com.

A bad photo, but this shows how the inline switch plugs in. The black cord leads to the transformer / power supply.

It works!

Roughing in floor and staircase.

Floor stained and installed. I need to finish it.

I’m trying to decide whether to go with the piano …

Or the harpsichord. I like how they both look.

Staircase is almost finished. I had to take it apart to stain the treads and railings while having everything else white. I broke four of the spindles and had to replace with Houseworks ones. I’ll show more of the staircase when I’m done with it.

Moving to the other side … I have much of the outside trimmed and finished.

  

Playing with furniture placement.

I decided to switch the bathroom to the top floor. The fixtures fit well in here, better than they did in the second floor room. Oh well. They match the wallpaper too.

The other side of the top floor will continue the bathroom. The washing and sitting area.

First floor / ground floor. Entrance hall will double as a sitting room.

This is my reasoning behind building the tall bay window extension–so I’d have more room for furniture! Not sure that the sofa in the window will stay, but it might.

Upstairs will have another sitting area / writing room. I plan to add a desk, either in the bay window or behind the staircase.

This is now the bedroom. Not much space, but it could be cozy. Everyone has a mannikin with a tutu in their bedroom, right?

Kitchen is still empty. I keep putting in the stuff I have for it, taking it out, debating arrangements. I’ll get there.

That’s it for now. Sandy has to make sure all is well beneath, though.

It’s definitely getting there!

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