Beacon Hill: Porch final trimming

4 Comments

I’ve come to the point where I’m putting the finishing touches on the Beacon Hill. First, on my own, I’m adding some horizontal and vertical boards (not part of the kit) to trim the raw edges and gaps between walls. I think it makes everything look more polished.

Back to the kit. The instructions have you start at the top of the house with all the trim and brackets, but I wanted to see the porch finished, so I worked from bottom up.

First, the post brackets, which go at the top of each porch post. They are in three pieces–you sandwich the large piece between two smaller and thinner pieces.

Like so.

I decided to glue, then paint, but you can do it the other way around. There are so many tiny pieces in this step that spray paint might be the best way to go. (I don’t like spray paint because of the fumes but I can imagine it would save time!)

I glued these on upside down the first time, but they go this way, with the curved end up, like a bird with its head up.

Next are the 50 million brackets that go between the porch posts. These again are sandwiched, two smalls around a large.

They need lots of sanding.

 

Two brackets go between each post with three on the right end. There are no measurements for centering them exactly, so eyeball it or measure and calculate.

The porch is finished with the long curved pieces between the posts.

The pieces are found in the middle of sheet 9 (where you punch out the large left side wall), so don’t lose track of it when you are putting the main pieces of the house together.

The pieces are in three sizes: one long one (seen at bottom), which goes on the side of the porch.

The small one (at the top in the photo) goes between the posts in front of the front door.

The medium sized ones go on the center and right front of the porch.

These are a pain to glue in (mine kept falling off) so tape helps until the glue is dry. Give it a day.

There we go–the porch trim done.

Staying on the ground floor, we have the bay roof brackets. They’re on sheet 23, the one that fell apart on me. Amazingly, I have not lost one piece (so far …)

These brackets are single thickness.

They go under the overhang on the kitchen bay (more will go on the bay windows on the other side of the house when I build it). For now, you need 10 for the kitchen bay window.

Eight go across the top of the window. Mine are spaces about 1.25 inches apart.  There’s supposed to be one facing the porch and one facing rear, but I couldn’t get them to fit right, so I eliminated them.

That’s it for the ground floor. Next time, a ton of brackets for the top of the house and tower.

Advertisements

Creekside Studio (Much needed break from Beacon Hill)

4 Comments

Taking a break from the Beacon Hill, I built this kit. Creekside Studio by Suzanne and Andrew’s Minis. This took me about a week–it’s 1/4 inch scale. Nice to do an entire build in a week!

Front door and porch.

The back door.

Right side of the house.

Left side and interior.

Suzanne and Andrew offer a landscape base for the house as well, which comes with material to do the dirt and grass. I thought ahead and purchased it when I bought the house kit.

The blank base.

The base provides the height for the porch steps to reach the back door.

I’ve painted the stones on the base here and added grass and dirt. I’ll plant a ton of flowers later–thinking of doing a vegetable garden too.

The “creek” looks like it has water in it. It’s triple gloss sealer.

The full creekbed side of the house.

The back door. I’ll put in bushes, flowers, and other fun stuff.

Right side of the house. I’m thinking of putting the kitchen garden here.

A fun kit, glad I bought it.

Beacon Hill: Trimming interior and building outer wall.

4 Comments

I did go back to the Beacon Hill and finish trimming the last room on the top floor, and the secret tower room.

This space will continue the bedroom–be a sitting area.

I had to do a ton of trimming here: Around the corners of the tower ceiling, the corners of the back wall, plus picture rail-like trim to cover slots, the raw edge of the divider wall, plus the usual baseboards and cornices.

This photo shows more how it will be one big room.

I trimmed up the tower room as well, including the window–which the kit has no interior trim for as this room is not supposed to be seen from the inside. The floor is scrapbooking paper–I was feeling whimsical. Maybe it’s an interesting floor cloth. I’ll do more with this room later.

All right–now that the interior is trimmed, time to build the outer wall for the side I cut away and trim the exterior.

I realized that before I could build the wall, I needed to build another wall sconce. The rear of the front hall is dark (chandelier is pretty but doesn’t generate much light). I need a matching one to the first one I built.

Out came my findings and paint. This sconce will go with the chandelier and other sconce already done. Painting the finding.

Gluing together the back, mirror, and arm with candle socket.

Finished sconce (which does light–I checked!)

The base wall. From this I will build a two-story bay window. The sconce had to be installed before the wall went up.

The base wall glued in place. Now I need to build the floors, sides, roof, and outer wall that will hold the windows.

By the way, I did finish the Creekside Studio, one of my interim projects. I’ll post those photos in the next post.

Break from Beacon Hill but back soon

1 Comment

This time I did have to take a break from the Beacon Hill. Too much!

I turned to other kits I had bought and stashed. First, a microscale flower shop:

I think one appeal of microscale is that you can build a whole house and landscape it in a weekend! That and it doesn’t take up much display space.

These both are kits from Robin Betterley: https://www.robinbetterley.com/collections/watercolors

Next, I started a quarter inch scale kit from Suzanne and Andrew’s that I’d been hoarding for a year or so.

This kit is called  “Creekside Studio”  in 1/4″ scale. Very small, a first floor and a loft, the first floor divided into two rooms by a cabinet. (I see this kit still for sale on Suzanne and Andrew’s site, so if interested, grab it. Their kits get retired.)  Creekside Studio by Suzanne and Andrew’s Minis

I’m almost finished with the structure. I’ll post pics when I’m done. This one is taking me about a week to finish (maybe two).

But I’m still plugging away on the Beacon Hill. I now have interior trim done for the second-floor room (will be the bathroom):

and the left half of the top floor, which will be a bedroom.

One reason for my slowdown, other than dollhouse fatigue, is having a lot of work to do at my job (real life). Minis had to go on the back burner for a while, always a bummer.

It’s also nice to do simple kits to step back from a more complicated one. Suzanne and Andrew (http://andrewsmini.com/miniatures/ ) and Robin Betterley (https://www.robinbetterley.com) have fun ones that look great when finished. (I promise I don’t work for them or do endorsements for them; I just like their stuff!)

I hate to admit it, but I can’t resist a great kit. I keep telling myself I will design my own houses, and then I see a fantastic, well-designed kit, and in it goes to my stash. But I swear I will make them all! I decided a few years ago that there’s a difference between collecting and hoarding …

More Beacon Hill anon.

 

Beacon Hill: Trimming the Interior

3 Comments

I thought I needed to take a break from the Beacon Hill–I was going to do another project–but then I turned the house around and looked inside. No, I want to finish! I was inspired to keep going with moldings and trim, plus finishing the lamp for the kitchen.

The kitchen needs a lot of trimming from the bay window trim in the kit to baseboards, cornices, an L-molding to cover the gap in the corner (from warping). The inside of the door needs to be trimmed out, and a doorframe put in.

Painting. The piece with the curlicue ends is the bay window molding. It took me a while to figure out how it fit!

Everything glued in place (below). The bay window molding fits onto the edges of the bay window opening walls. (It makes sense when you stick it in there and see that it fits exactly in the opening.) The kitchen shelf (from the kit), fits over notches that stick out from the windows into the kitchen.

Next I trimmed out the main hall. Needed to cover raw edges and make everything look neater. I covered the ends of the staircase posts as well with stained boards.

The molding painted, varnished, and in place (below).

The second floor hall trim cut and waiting for painting and installation.

Back to the kitchen–needed to finish the light before I put in flooring and trim in room above it. It works!!

So this is what I’ve been doing behind the scenes. More trimming in the upstairs rooms to come.Almost done!

Then it will be back to the outside to build a wall and do the final work.

 

Miniature Luxuries Sale

3 Comments

Popping in to say I got a note that says Miniature Luxuries (http://miniatureluxuries.com/) is having a huge sale starting today. They have wallpapers, fabric, laces, and decals for dishes and so forth, and trims. All scales. They have lovely stuff. Enjoy!

Beacon Hill: Front Door

5 Comments

The front door is quite lovely–it’s too bad it’s usually hidden in most photos I see of the Beacon Hill.

img_7568-1

The pieces for the front door are on sheet 23, my infamous sheet that disintegrated. I managed to find all the parts!

img_7569-1

img_7570

All the parts punched out and ready. We have two door trims which are sandwiched together, and three parts to the doors (outer, middle, inner), which are also sandwiched together.

The interesting thing is, the front door trim has a big fanlight, but there is none in the house wall itself.

img_7576

This gives you some interesting possibilities. You could leave it so the painted wall shows through, you could put a louvred fan up there, paint it a different color, or try out stained glass.

I thought about it, and decided to look through an adult coloring book type box of cards I bought myself (“art therapy”), and see if I could find a good pattern that looks like stained glass.

img_7573

Found this one, so I’m going to go with it.

img_7571

The doors are in 3 parts: The front, middle, and back (interior). The front and back are exactly the same. The middle parts have the solid panel in the bottom.

The middle gets sandwiched between the front and back, with the plastic window between the middle and back.

img_7572

When the door panels are put together, the middle will show through the frame of the front (and back). Here is what the front will look like with the trim.

img_7579

What it will look like from the back (which is amazingly the same).

img_7582-2

Everything painted with my colors. I’ve glued the front panels (red) onto the middle, which I’ve painted white.

The plastic pane gets glued to the back of the middle panel, sandwiched between middle and back panels.

img_7584-2

img_7585-2

The “stained glass” panel in place.

img_7586-2

The trim glued in place, clamped until dry.

img_7587-2

Trim and stained glass window in place.

Now, my doors, when I put together, were so warped that I couldn’t make them stay in straight inside the door opening. They’re almost twisted, and the frames keep falling apart (see?).

img_7825

So, I’m reconstructing them from scratch, using 1/4″ wood strips, plus a couple 1/2″ strips, and a some basswood for the middle panels.

img_7822

Outer doors made of 1/4″ strips, with 1/2″ strip for bottom piece.

img_7821

img_7824

A square jig keeps everything straight.

img_7826

The inner panels are 1/4″ strips with a basswood insert of about 2 3/4″ high.

 

 

img_7827

All the pieces constructed.

img_7829

Door panels painted in my colors.

img_7830

Middle panels with plastic window inserts glued to them. I had to trim the plastic a little, but there’s enough around the edges to allow that.

img_7831

Doors finished.

img_7833

Glued in place in the house.

img_7835 img_7836

Doors from the interior.

img_7840

House so far. Much more trimming to be done!

The only thing left on this side of the house is for the trims to the porch and the curlicue pieces that go all over the place to be painted on glued on. I’m going to hold off on that while I design and build the missing wall of the house.

img_7837

I’m going to do a wall with big bay windows on both floors so I’ll have more space to put furniture. I’ll show what happens in another post.

 

 

Older Entries Newer Entries

%d bloggers like this: