Beacon Hill: Left side top floor, front bay, interior

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I’m setting the house on top of the garage kit from Hobby Builders Supply. My idea is to run stairs up the outside on the left to a porch (which I’ll build), having the front entrance where the side bay window is. I’ll build that later.

For now, I’ve added the walls to the third floor, and given them a primer coat of latex paint.

I realized I should put the bay window on the front, so if I’m wallpapering the inside, I don’t mess it up trying to decorate the interior of the bay.

Bay window parts are pretty simple–the middle and two sides (middle is bigger), plus an “extension” piece and trim for the top. The thinner part of the window wall goes on top (shown here).

The windows fit easily onto the tabs that extend out from the house.

The extension piece (the smaller of the two half octagonal pieces) goes here. It sort of rests on the edges.

The trim piece goes on the extension pieces, overlapping evenly on all sides.

For now, I’m leaving the extension and trim pieces off, because I’m still not sure what colors I’ll use for the exterior.

Back inside. I want a fireplace wall that I’ll trim off, so I painted it with three coats of antique white craft paint and two coats of clear gloss finish (Deco Art is the brand I’m using).

The opening on the right will be the front entrance / porch.

Wallpaper added. All the wallpaper I bought for this house didn’t look quite right when I put it with the flooring and the furniture that will be in here. But oh well. Stock for another house!

This is scrapbook paper. I decided to be a little eclectic. I’ll wallpaper the insides of the bay as well.

Next, finishing the ceilings! And possibly making chandeliers. Or maybe I’ll do more of the structure before installing lights.

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Beacon Hill: Left side continued

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I’ve glued together the left and left front walls and put in the second floor. I went all over it with a thin coat of latex to seal the wood and then started laying in the electric tape.

As you can see, I cut a hole in the second floor for the stairs I’ll put in myself.

Added the third floor and finished putting in the tape wiring. This used a 15 ft. roll of the tape.

I decided against a staircase going to floor three so I could have more room on the floor for furniture. I’m thinking I’ll leave two sides open, so more can be seen, which means I’ll have to put in columns to brace the unsupported corners.

What I learned from building the first half: Glue together the walls before painting and decorating. Warpage is greatly reduced. You can make paper patterns of the walls for wallpaper and install after running in the tape wiring (if using tape wiring).

What I learned from other projects: Bending the tape wire in 90-degree turns is much faster and easier than splicing. I show more details on tape wiring here: https://jennsminis.wordpress.com/2015/08/10/half-scale-bungalow-lights/

Now to decorate walls and ceilings, make and put in lights. I’m going to attempt some ornate chandeliers. I’m excited to be progressing!

Back to the Beacon Hill

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I’m returning to work on the Beacon Hill, ready to tackle the second side of the house! I cut it apart, remember? So far I like what I’ve done with the first side, but let’s see what happens!

My dear husband got me a gift certificate to HBS, so I bought this lovely staircase, which I will put in the left portion of the house.

I plan to leave both the back and side open so more of the interior can be viewed. The staircase will block too much if only the back is open, and I want the pretty furniture I’ve collected for this part of the house to be seen.

I’m also going to put this half on top of a garage, and I believe I’ll replace the side bay window with a front door.

More to come.

Beacon Hill: A Gazillion Brackets

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Final step is to do the brackets around the tower and mansard roof and the decorative roof brackets.

The instructions call this “exterior trim.” I say, “a ton o’ brackets.”

First, the brackets that go around the bottom of the tower and mansard roof.

These are sandwiched, large between two small. You need four complete brackets for each side of the tower, four on the front wall right and five on the right wall. That’s 25 total, and that’s just this half of the house … (you need 12 for the other half if you’re building the whole thing like a normal person). That’s a lotta brackets.

Ready for more sanding and painting.

You end up with a bunch of these.

Glue them bird-head up around the base of the tower, all four sides.

Back of the tower.

This is the right side walls–four in front, five in back.

Note that the end brackets on each wall are right at the edge, over the vertical trim. I glued those brackets on first, then spaced the others according to those.

The tower brackets were spaced about 2.5 inches from one another, the front wall 2 inches, the side wall 2.5 inches.

Last are the pointy and curly brackets that go around the edges of the roofs. Four complete ones on the tower, three on the porch, two on the right side (and three on the left). The look  like this on the sheets.

We have standalone posts, posts with curls, and curls alone. Again, you glue these brackets together in sandwiches.

You make a sandwich of two standalone posts around one post with curly. The unattached curl gets glued to the post depending on which direction you need to go on the roof. Those are glued on as you place them on the rooftops.

When they’re glued in place, they’ll look like this.

Don’t glue the last curly part in place! I’m holding it here as a demo.

Starting with the porch: The posts are all glued with the flat side of the post facing front (*except* the one on the back of the porch which faces the side–got it?)

Here are the post sandwiches glued in place.

The lone curly is then glued to the other side. For the porch post in the back, it’s done. It doesn’t get a second curly.

The porch roof done. Note that the brackets are on the *inner* edge of the roof trim.

On the tower–the four post sandwiches in place. Again, the flat side of the picket faces front (and rear), and they’re glued on the inner edge of the trim.

The curlys all glued in place to complete the brackets.

Brackets done on the side roof.

And … that’s it!! That is the last bit of the kit for the right side of the house.

I still have to finish the wall I knocked out, do a lot of touch-up paint, and trim more raw edges. Plus I did not use the foundation trim–I will be putting stone or brick paper around the bottom.

But hey, there we have it! Almost ready to move in!

I’ll probably take another break and build a different kit or smaller project, then come back and completely finish this half of the house before I start on the other half …

Beacon Hill: Porch final trimming

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I’ve come to the point where I’m putting the finishing touches on the Beacon Hill. First, on my own, I’m adding some horizontal and vertical boards (not part of the kit) to trim the raw edges and gaps between walls. I think it makes everything look more polished.

Back to the kit. The instructions have you start at the top of the house with all the trim and brackets, but I wanted to see the porch finished, so I worked from bottom up.

First, the post brackets, which go at the top of each porch post. They are in three pieces–you sandwich the large piece between two smaller and thinner pieces.

Like so.

I decided to glue, then paint, but you can do it the other way around. There are so many tiny pieces in this step that spray paint might be the best way to go. (I don’t like spray paint because of the fumes but I can imagine it would save time!)

I glued these on upside down the first time, but they go this way, with the curved end up, like a bird with its head up.

Next are the 50 million brackets that go between the porch posts. These again are sandwiched, two smalls around a large.

They need lots of sanding.

 

Two brackets go between each post with three on the right end. There are no measurements for centering them exactly, so eyeball it or measure and calculate.

The porch is finished with the long curved pieces between the posts.

The pieces are found in the middle of sheet 9 (where you punch out the large left side wall), so don’t lose track of it when you are putting the main pieces of the house together.

The pieces are in three sizes: one long one (seen at bottom), which goes on the side of the porch.

The small one (at the top in the photo) goes between the posts in front of the front door.

The medium sized ones go on the center and right front of the porch.

These are a pain to glue in (mine kept falling off) so tape helps until the glue is dry. Give it a day.

There we go–the porch trim done.

Staying on the ground floor, we have the bay roof brackets. They’re on sheet 23, the one that fell apart on me. Amazingly, I have not lost one piece (so far …)

These brackets are single thickness.

They go under the overhang on the kitchen bay (more will go on the bay windows on the other side of the house when I build it). For now, you need 10 for the kitchen bay window.

Eight go across the top of the window. Mine are spaces about 1.25 inches apart.  There’s supposed to be one facing the porch and one facing rear, but I couldn’t get them to fit right, so I eliminated them.

That’s it for the ground floor. Next time, a ton of brackets for the top of the house and tower.

Beacon Hill: Trimming interior and building outer wall.

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I did go back to the Beacon Hill and finish trimming the last room on the top floor, and the secret tower room.

This space will continue the bedroom–be a sitting area.

I had to do a ton of trimming here: Around the corners of the tower ceiling, the corners of the back wall, plus picture rail-like trim to cover slots, the raw edge of the divider wall, plus the usual baseboards and cornices.

This photo shows more how it will be one big room.

I trimmed up the tower room as well, including the window–which the kit has no interior trim for as this room is not supposed to be seen from the inside. The floor is scrapbooking paper–I was feeling whimsical. Maybe it’s an interesting floor cloth. I’ll do more with this room later.

All right–now that the interior is trimmed, time to build the outer wall for the side I cut away and trim the exterior.

I realized that before I could build the wall, I needed to build another wall sconce. The rear of the front hall is dark (chandelier is pretty but doesn’t generate much light). I need a matching one to the first one I built.

Out came my findings and paint. This sconce will go with the chandelier and other sconce already done. Painting the finding.

Gluing together the back, mirror, and arm with candle socket.

Finished sconce (which does light–I checked!)

The base wall. From this I will build a two-story bay window. The sconce had to be installed before the wall went up.

The base wall glued in place. Now I need to build the floors, sides, roof, and outer wall that will hold the windows.

By the way, I did finish the Creekside Studio, one of my interim projects. I’ll post those photos in the next post.

Beacon Hill: Trimming the Interior

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I thought I needed to take a break from the Beacon Hill–I was going to do another project–but then I turned the house around and looked inside. No, I want to finish! I was inspired to keep going with moldings and trim, plus finishing the lamp for the kitchen.

The kitchen needs a lot of trimming from the bay window trim in the kit to baseboards, cornices, an L-molding to cover the gap in the corner (from warping). The inside of the door needs to be trimmed out, and a doorframe put in.

Painting. The piece with the curlicue ends is the bay window molding. It took me a while to figure out how it fit!

Everything glued in place (below). The bay window molding fits onto the edges of the bay window opening walls. (It makes sense when you stick it in there and see that it fits exactly in the opening.) The kitchen shelf (from the kit), fits over notches that stick out from the windows into the kitchen.

Next I trimmed out the main hall. Needed to cover raw edges and make everything look neater. I covered the ends of the staircase posts as well with stained boards.

The molding painted, varnished, and in place (below).

The second floor hall trim cut and waiting for painting and installation.

Back to the kitchen–needed to finish the light before I put in flooring and trim in room above it. It works!!

So this is what I’ve been doing behind the scenes. More trimming in the upstairs rooms to come.Almost done!

Then it will be back to the outside to build a wall and do the final work.

 

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