Back to the Beacon Hill

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I’m returning to work on the Beacon Hill, ready to tackle the second side of the house! I cut it apart, remember? So far I like what I’ve done with the first side, but let’s see what happens!

My dear husband got me a gift certificate to HBS, so I bought this lovely staircase, which I will put in the left portion of the house.

I plan to leave both the back and side open so more of the interior can be viewed. The staircase will block too much if only the back is open, and I want the pretty furniture I’ve collected for this part of the house to be seen.

I’m also going to put this half on top of a garage, and I believe I’ll replace the side bay window with a front door.

More to come.

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Beacon Hill: Finishing the Stairs and Moving On

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Once the lights downstairs were finished, I could add the flooring to the staircase hall. Now, I can go on to putting in the railings and posts of the staircase.

Just a note: I advise getting out wood sheet 27 with all the staircase posts and rails and the schematic drawing for sheet 27 and staring at both until you figure out what is what. It helps to take a pencil and label the pieces on the sheet so you’re familiar with them, and you know what they are when you punch them out.

Notice that there are a bunch of pieces marked “staircase posts.” Those are used in most places, except at bottom of the first floor, bottom of the second floor, and the end of one end of the shorter second-floor bannister railing. I mention it, because my instructions weren’t that clear. I’ll note in bold where those are.

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The instructions start you off prepping the banisters that will go around the staircase openings. I opted to do the second floor only and do the third floor once I have the flooring in up there.

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The three pieces where they will go.

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Pre-gluing the shortest banister and longest at right angles.

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Next I painted to go with the rest. Posts and top rails will be stained.

For sealing the wood, I’ve started to use Dura Clear Ultra Matte from Folk Art. I paint a coat of white (or whatever color) then a coat of Ultra Matte, then a second coat of paint, the finish with gloss varnish (also Dura Clear). Find Dura Clear in Michaels or other craft stores.

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Posts are glued flat on the ends of the railings. The instructions were a little unclear, and it took me a while to figure out that the flat side is glued to the flat part of the railings. I thought they went on the ends, but no.

NOTE: One end of this railing section is narrower than the other (on the left hand side in my photo). The right side here gets a regular “staircase post”, the other gets the “Second floor narrow post trim.”

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Here are the railing sections with the posts glued on and the top and bottom rails glued on. The top and bottom rails actually do go on the edges.

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Putting the railing sections aside, we start adding posts and rails to the staircase itself. This first one, at the bottom of B is the “First floor long post trim.”

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Now I add the corner post between A&B  (This is Piece A & B Corner trim). The notch goes over the railing section. The short top rail goes on piece B.

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“Pieces A&F corner trim” goes on the outside of F like this (one end has an angle that follows the angle of the staircase, and a notch to go over upper railing section). The top rail A goes on top of the railing.

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The posts at the top of the stairs–again, they go flat against the railing sections, not on the ends. (These are some of the ones labeled “staircase posts.”)

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Railings, of course, go on top of the railing sections.

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Last, I put in the prepared railing sections that go around the staircase on the second floor.

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At the bottom of the second staircase is the “Second floor long post trim.” Rail goes up the stairs on top of the long railing section. A notch in this rail helps fit it against the opening to the third floor.

I’m stopping there–I’ll do the third floor later. Plus there are “Post Caps” that go on the top of the posts.

I’m not sure I like the unfinished look of the staircase posts, as though someone bought 2x4s at the hardware store and made a staircase. But I’ll probably trim them later, or I’ll see what kind of trimming the instructions has us do.

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Now I can at last put on the tower front. I had to do some slot trimming, plus I had a bit of warpage, but painters tape is helpful to hold things in place while the glue dries.

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The tower all in place from the inside.

Next I’ll continue decoration and move up to the third floor and start on the roof.

Beacon Hill: Electricity and Making my Own Lighting Fixtures

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I realized I needed to stop and plan the electricity before I finished the staircases (with railings and posts), because:

I want to do chandeliers

Chandelier wires will run up to the floor above

I need to have the wiring in place before I can put the flooring in

I need to put the flooring in before I can finish the staircases.

I had the mad idea to make my own lighting fixtures for this house, which turned out much better than I expected! (photos below)

So, here we go. I decided to do tape wiring–I will do mostly ceiling lights, so tape will go on the floors, where it will be hidden by flooring (which I won’t glue all the way down so it can be removed for repairs)

I pondered a long time how to run the tape, considering I had already finished some of the walls.

I hit on building a small wall in the back and running the tape up the inside of that, hidden from all eyes.

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A 1-inch by 1/8-inch wood strip. The strip not only hides the tape but the raw edges of the interior walls.

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Tape runs up the inside of the board, which will later be painted.

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Comes out on the floors.

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This is as far as I’ve gone–floor of the third story. When I get more walls and the roof on, I’ll continue. You’ll notice my messy folds. I prefer to fold rather than splice, because splices can come undone. I learned to do this from the book: Dollhouse Lighting: Electrification in Miniature (http://www.miniatures.com/Dollhouse-Lighting-Electrification-In-Miniature-P17973.aspx)

Now: The lighting fixtures.

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Here are some of my supplies. I had to go buy a storage box at a craft store for these along with what I already have.

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I had in mind to make a “porcelain” chandelier using instructions found in the book “Bangles, Baubles, and Beads,” sold by JAR / JAF Miniatures http://jar-jaf.com/ (click on “Books” ; they also have the electrification book)

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Findings being glued on the main chandelier wheel. This will be electrified, but by a single bulb while the candles are faked.

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The basic chandelier put together.

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A glossy white coat transforms it.

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Next, I painted the leaves with Kelly green tube acrylic paint (Liquitex).

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I wasn’t certain of the color for the roses until I put it on, but I like it! The pink is also Liquitex tube acrylic paint (found in the artists section of craft stores or art supply stores). The color for roses and leaves is dry-brushed on very carefully. No globs!

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The finished chandelier (except for the candles)

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It lights! (Getting the wires through the medallion and the upper floor involved a bit of colorful language. Even the cats ran.)

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I’ve added the candles.

Now–this chandelier doesn’t give out much light, because the bulb glows through the bottom finding. Looks pretty, but not much illumination.

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So I said, What the heck? Let’s add a sconce. I have the findings on hand.

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This is a modification of a sconce in JAR / JAF’s book–I didn’t have the exact findings, but these were very close. The candle light socket and flame bulb can be purchased inexpensively from CirKit Concepts (http://cir-kitconcepts.com/shop/  Click “Light bulbs”)

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I stuck it here on the wall by the turn of the stairs. It will be hard to see once all the walls are on, but it will light up the corner.

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Both lamps in place.

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Another shot of the lights.

Yay! Now that those problems are solved (and I’ve stopped cursing), I will now put in the flooring! So I can finish the stairs and stop obsessing about them.

 

Beacon Hill: First Floor Staircase, Part 2

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Continuing from my previous post:

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After I deepened the notch in the second floor for trim piece F, it slid right in and fit over the staircase. This is looking from the front of the house.

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Next, trim piece D is fitted over this side, again resting in a notch in the second floor. Now to paint.

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Paint added. I should have painted the trim first (had to mask off the ceiling wallpaper so I wouldn’t ruin it), but I was afraid that the painted trim wouldn’t fit right–paint makes wood swell and warp. Oh well. It’s done now!

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Here is the painted trim on the other side of the staircase, looking from the back of the house. Notice I didn’t punch out the holes on the D trim. I’m going to leave it in and add a false little door to make it look like it leads to stairs to the basement.

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Over in the kitchen, I added wallpaper to the back wall, and a border of paper to the right wall.

Next I need to paint the second floor and ready it for wallpaper so I can go on to the next step, the second-floor staircase. In the staircase hall, I’ll paint the walls and paper the ceiling. The room above the kitchen will be the bathroom, which I will paper.

Next time–Second floor staircase. After I paint like crazy.

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